Mount Royal, A Territory to Discover

Home /History & Architecture | Views & Lookouts /Beaver Lake

  • Discovery file
  • Slide-show
  • Audio-video

The front of a building with an accordeon rooft, glass wall and orage colour paintings.

Beaver Lake Pavilion
Inauguration: 1961

When it was built, Beaver Lake Pavilion was considered one of the most innovative buildings in Québec. Designed by architects Hazen Size and Guy Desbarats, the three glazed sides provide park visitors with an unparalleled view of the lake and its surroundings. The building, with its undulating roof floating over the windowed facades, is a landmark for walkers. The large coloured panels that adorn the exterior were created in 2005 by the artist Claude Vermette.

A variety of services for sports lovers and park users are situated on the main floor, while the second floor is reserved for relaxation and dining.

This exceptional building is included in Québec’s heritage register of modern architecture (DOCOMOMO international).
 

Credit:

Beaver Lake Pavilion                                                          
Les amis de la montagne, 2007  

 


Questions :

(1) Beaver lake is an ancient volcano crater.

Answer False

(2) There are beavers in the lake.

Answer False

Montreal Tandem Club drive, ). vers 1890
W.J. Gage & Co. Ltd; Toronto
Old postal card numéro 737
CP 2927
© Collection BNQ


 

Montreal Tandem Club drive, around 1890
W.J. Gage & Co. Ltd; Toronto
Old postcard numéro 737
CP 2927
© Collection BNQ


 

Montreal Tandem Club drive, vers 1890
W.J. Gage & Co. Ltd; Toronto
Old post card, number 737
CP 2927
© Collection BNQ


 

Cross country skiing at Mont Royal Park.
© Collection Les amis de la montagne

 

View from Jeanne-Mance park.
Photographer : Samuel Montigné
© Les amis de la montagne's Collection

 

Winter sport, Mont Royal Park
Photographer : Samuel Montigné
© Les amis de la montagne's Collection

 

Sleigh ride, Mont Royal Park
Photographer : Andrew Dobrowolskyj
© Les amis de la montagne's Collection

Cross country skier, Mont Royal Park, 2007
Photographer : Samuel Montigné
© Les amis de la montagne's Collection

Snow balls, Mont Royal Park
Photographer : Samuel Montigné
© Les amis de la montagne's Collection

 

Skater, Mont-Royal Park, 2007
Photographer : Samuel Montigné
© Les amis de la montagne's Collection

 

Snowhoers, Mont Royal Park, 2007
Photographer : Samuel Montigné
© Les amis de la montagne's Collection

Winter landscapel, Mont Royal Park, 1986
© Les amis de la montagne's Collection

Tobogganning, Mont Royal Park
Photographer : Samuel Montigné
© Les amis de la montagne's Collection

An angel in the snow, Mont-Royal park
Photographer : Samuel Montigné
© Les amis de la montagne's Collection

Bird feeder, Parc du Mont-Royal
Photographer : Jean-Michel Villanove
© Les amis de la montagne's Collection

 

After practicing ski, parc du Mont-Royal
Photographe : Samuel Montigné
© Collection Les amis de la montagne

 

Three ski sled, Mont Royal Park
Photographer : Samuel Montigné
© Les amis de la montagne's Collection

4048Kb

Download Adobe Flash Player

Mission: Find the beaver

Tuesday, June ninth, two twelve p.m., and I have a mission:
Find out whether or not there are beavers in Beaver Lake.
…hmmm, let's go see.
Bus number eleven. Beaver Lake stop please!
A few steps and to my right, a modern concrete building with an accordion roof.
It’s the famous Beaver Lake pavilion.
I climb to the first floor and go inside. A rainbow of wooden chairs right out of the nineteen sixties. Huge picture windows to take in the view. In front of me, a lake in the shape of an exaggerated cloverleaf.
My mission begins.
Near the lake,
two seagulls,
a duck.
In the water,
Goldfish everywhere,
water weeds.
But no beavers.
In the distance, a weeping willow and underneath it, an old man. I go over, sit down and start talking to him. What luck, this guy is a real history buff!

He explains to me that the lake is not a volcanic crater as some people think. In fact, the lake was designed by a celebrated landscape architect, Frederick Todd. Above all, I learned that it was dug out with shovels in nineteen thirty seven. While digging, the workers found the remains of a very old beaver lodge. They named the lake in honour of this discovery.

And so, there are no beavers in Beaver Lake.
Mission accomplished, four o’clock p.m.
In front of me, light glimmers off the lake. I can see the sun dancing in the distance, shining off the dome of the Oratory. There is a gentle breeze.
Hmmm… next mission… a nap in the soft grass.